Last modified on 13 October 2012, at 09:43

nihilator

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

nihilate +‎ -or.

NounEdit

nihilator (plural nihilators)

  1. That which annihilates.
    • 1980, in Darshana International, volumes 20–21,[1] J. P. Atreya, page 80:
      Being alone can nihilate without itself being nihilated. In the act of nihilation the nihilator remains.
    • 1988, Joseph C. McLelland, Prometheus Rebound: The Irony of Atheism, Wilfrid Laurier University Press, ISBN 978-0-88920-974-9, page 267:
      Every ego is engaged in “a desperate effort to be” - desperate because we are all nihilators defending our fragile project of being, which necessarily involves mutual destruction: []
    • 1994, John Passmore, A Hundred Years of Philosophy,[2] Penguin Books, ISBN 0140136711, page 606:
      [] French Resistance left him with a feeling of human solidarity quite absent from his earlier works, in which other people are most characteristically represented as Heidegger’s ‘They’ -- obstacles to our discovery of ourselves, nihilators of our possibilities.