Last modified on 25 May 2014, at 13:05

notate bene

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Classical Latin notāte (plural present active imperative form of notō (I mark”, “I note”, “I observe); cf. notā) + bene (well), formed on the pattern of nota bene, used as its plural

PronunciationEdit

  • (Latin) IPA(key): /noˈtaːte ˌbene/

InterjectionEdit

notate bene

  1. plural form of nota bene
    • 1940: the Classical Association of the Middle West and South, the Classical Association of New England, the California Classical Association, the Classical Association of the Atlantic States, and the Classical Association of the Pacific Northwest, The Classical journal, volume 36, page 22 (Classical Association of the Middle West and South)
      “We cover some of this material in our seventh- and eighth-grade social science classes.” Notate bene those magic words, “social science!”
    • 2003: Mary Ann Vigilante Mannino and Justin Vitiello, Breaking open: reflections on Italian American women’s writing, page 28 (Purdue University Press; ISBN 1557532435, 9781557532435)
      Notate bene: As an existentialist “condemned to skepticism” — especially regarding my own assertions — I entertain the following doubts: by the time this book goes into print and on the market, the Italy a few of us know today will have changed radically.

LatinEdit

PhraseEdit

notāte bene

  1. plural form of notā bene