Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 19:55

novelty

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French novelté (Modern French nouveauté), from the adjective novel, ultimately from Latin novellus.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

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Wikipedia

novelty (countable and uncountable, plural novelties)

  1. The state of being new or novel; newness.
    • 2012 May 24, Nathan Rabin, “Film: Reviews: Men In Black 3”, The Onion AV Club:
      Men In Black 3 lacks the novelty of the first film, and its take on the late ’60s feels an awful lot like a psychedelic dress-up party, all broad caricatures and groovy vibes.
  2. A new product; an innovation.
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 10.
      Reconciling profound enquiry with clearness, and truth with novelty.
  3. A small mass-produced trinket.
  4. In novelty theory, newness, density of complexification, and dynamic change as opposed to static habituation.

TranslationsEdit

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Derived termsEdit