Last modified on 9 November 2014, at 23:39

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman obit, Middle French obit, and their source, Latin obitus (going down; death), from obīre (to go down, to die).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɒbɪt/, /ˈəʊbɪt/

NounEdit

obit (plural obits)

  1. (obsolete) Death of a person. [14th-17th c.]
  2. (Christianity, now historical) A mass or other service held for the soul of a dead person. [from 14th c.]
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, p. 582:
      Medieval wills often contained bequests to pay for the singing of special (non-perpetual) masses on the testator's behalf. These obits, as they were called, combined alms for the poor with masses for the dead.
  3. A record of a person's death. [from 15th c.]

Etymology 2Edit

Shortened from obituary.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

obit (plural obits)

  1. (colloquial) An obituary.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

obit

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of obeō