Last modified on 5 June 2014, at 20:13

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps cognate with Old Provençal oc (yes).

InterjectionEdit

och

  1. (chiefly Scotland, Ireland) general interjection of confirmation, affirmation, and often disapproval.
  2. (chiefly Scotland, Ireland) an expression of anger, frustration, surprise

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

och

  1. alas

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German ouh, from Proto-Germanic *auk. Cognate with German auch (also), Dutch ook (also), West Frisian ek (also, too), Icelandic og (and).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

och

  1. also
  2. even

SynonymsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) otg
  • (Vallader) ot

EtymologyEdit

From Latin octo.

NumberEdit

och

  1. (cardinal, Puter) eight

Scottish GaelicEdit

InterjectionEdit

och

  1. alas

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ok, unstressed variant of Proto-Germanic *auk (also). Cognate with Norwegian and Danish og and with German auch.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

och

  1. and; used to connect two homogeneous (similar) words or phrases
    Jag gillar hundar och katter.
    I like dogs and cats.
  2. and; used to denote the last item of a list
    äpplen, apelsiner och päron
  3. (mathematics) and, plus
    Två och tre är fem.
    Two and three is five.
  4. used to connect two finite verbs to denote that the two actions are performed at the same time
    Jag sitter och läser.
    I'm sitting reading.
  5. used to connect two finite verbs to denote that the first is done in order to be able to do the second
    Ska vi gå och bada?
    Should we go swimming?
  6. (poetic) Introduces a main clause which somehow is bound to a previous clause
    Och det vart afton, och det vart morgon, den andra dagen.
    And there was evening and there was morning, the second day.

Related termsEdit