of one mind

EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

of one mind (not generally comparable, comparative more of one mind, superlative most of one mind)

  1. (idiomatic, of two or more people) Having the same viewpoint, opinion, or attitude; in agreement.
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, ch. 52:
      "Come, Mr. Wickham, we are brother and sister, you know. Do not let us quarrel about the past. In future, I hope we shall be always of one mind."
    • 1856, Charlotte M. Yonge, The Daisy Chain, or Aspirations, ch. 7:
      [T]he two sisters were more of one mind than usual.
    • 1895, Thomas Hardy, The Return of the Native, ch. 4:
      "How extraordinary that you and my mother should be of one mind about this!" said Yeobright.
    • 1983 July 5, Jonathan Fuerbringer, "Critics Divided on What to Do about Unpopular Income Tax," New York Times (retrieved 2 Jan 2011):
      However, just as the critics are not of one mind in their criticism, so they are far from united on what to do.
    • 2005 Feb. 13, Bruce Crumley, "Bizwatch: Tax Americana," Time:
      French President Jacques Chirac may be the anti-George W. Bush in foreign policy, but when it comes to lowering taxes, the two leaders are of one mind.

Usage notesEdit

  • Almost always preceded by a form of the verb to be.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 16 June 2013, at 13:33