of the same stripe

EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

of the same stripe

  1. (idiomatic) Of the same kind; having the same opinion or viewpoint.
    • 1865 Nov. 23, "The Tribune's Candidates for Mayor and Corporation Counsel," New York Times (retrieved 23 Feb 2013):
      [T]he Tribune . . . may not mislead Union electors by imputing Republicanism to Mr. HECKER. The Tribune takes Mr. O'GORMAN with his secession record—Mr. HECKER is of the same stripe.
    • 1920, Sherwood Anderson, Poor White, ch. 8:
      "Well, it is the same thing over again," he thought bitterly, "like mother, like daughter—they are both of the same stripe."
    • 1922, Irving Bacheller, In the Days of Poor Richard, ch. 8:
      I had no gods to bother me, and my friends were of the same stripe.
    • 1992 March 1, "Viewpoint: A year later" (editorial), Observer-Reporter (Washington, Pennsylvania), p. B4 (retrieved 23 Feb 2013):
      Once having overthrown Saddam, we would have faced two choices: accepting another dictator of the same stripe . . . or getting bogged down trying to administer the place ourselves.
    • 2009 August 10, Joseph L. Galloway, "What the US needs is an outburst of common sense," JuneauEmpire.com (retrieved 23 Feb 2013):
      It is good old unregulated American greed of the same stripe that drove this country into its current economic meltdown.
Last modified on 16 June 2013, at 13:34