off like a bride's nightie

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A reference to the supposed eagerness of just-married couples to have sexual intercourse on the night of their wedding. Australian from 1960.

AdjectiveEdit

off like a bride's nightie (not comparable)

  1. (Australia, slang, simile) Making a rapid departure; away. [From 1960.]
    Just before it was to be his shout, he was off like a bride′s nightie.
    • 1995, James Mitchell, So Far from Home, 1997, page 216,
      Missing because I′d been happy and didn′t need him, though I went to him fast enough when the happiness was over. Off like a bride′s nightie.
    • 1998, Harry Bowling, As Time Goes By, unnumbered page,
      [] Tell me, are you still intending to join the armed forces?’
      ‘Soon as ever I can, judge,’ Joe told him firmly, ‘I′ll be off like a bride′s nightie.’
    • 2004, Mina Ford, My Fake Wedding, page 154,
      ‘S′not that,’ she said, ‘It′s just if I give in so soon he′ll be off like a bride′s nightie. So I have to get it elsewhere, if you know what I mean. []
    1. (Australia, horse racing) Moving quickly and resolutely.

Usage notesEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 16 June 2013, at 13:36