onpass

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

onpass (third-person singular simple present onpasses, present participle onpassing, simple past and past participle onpassed)

  1. (transitive) To pass along or hand over.
    • 2004, "Fed: Canberra to onpass torture claims to US," AAP General News (Australia), 3 Jun. (retrieved 21 Jan. 2009):
      Canberra will pass on to the United States allegations by two former British detainees that Australian terror suspect Mamdouh Habib was tortured at Guantanamo Bay.
    • 2007, "Nuke News From North Korea," Wall Street Journal, 23 Jun., p. A10 (retrieved 21 Jan. 2009):
      Presumably the North Koreans balked because they hadn't been able to find any financial institution that would onpass to them the $25 million unfrozen by the U.S. from a bank in Macau.
    • 2009, Rita Trichur and Brett Popplewell, "Banks urged to match full rate cut," Toronto Star (Canada), 20 Jan., p. B7 (retrieved 21 Jan. 2009):
      While most expect the central bank to cut again today, not everyone is convinced commercial banks will onpass the full savings.

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Last modified on 16 June 2013, at 17:07