EnglishEdit

NounEdit

opia pl

  1. plural form of opium
    • late 19th–early 20th centuries: United States Government Printing Office, United States Congressional Serial Set, p58
      …are found to have opia on board, both ship and cargo shall be confiscated,…
    • 1959: Ramananda Chatterjee, The Modern Review, volume 105 — 1959 January–May, p384 (The Modern Review Office)
      “Religion is the opia and slavery and misery that follow when we people.”
    • 1975: Dov Bing, China: Cultural and Political Perspectives, pp212[1] & 218[2] (Longman Paul)
    • 1985: The Committee on Labor and Human Resources for the United States Senate and Congress, International Narcotics Control Report: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on…, p11
      …the flow of opia more effective interdiction elimination of heroin labs.
    • 2001: Andrew Salter, Conditioned Reflex Therapy, p47 (SelfHelpBooks.com (Wellness Institute, Inc.); ISBN 1587410486 (10), ISBN 978-1587410482 (13))
      …deciding upon a combination of syllables which would not be common enough to bring on the association, but which would be easily remembered by me. I decided on the combination, “caine opia,” by taking the last syllable of novocaine and combining it with opium, which in my mind has an association with novocaine.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Like many western practices, traditional Chinese treatments aim to comfort, and who are we to call for the withdrawal of this ‘opium for the people’ when we cling to our own opia.
  2. ^ One always hopes, in great cataclysms such as the French, the Russian, and the Chinese revolutions, that the good results will outweigh the obvious sufferings. ‘Religion is the opium of the people: abolish it, let the people’s minds become clear and unclouded’ is the cry. But why not the medical opia too?

LatinEdit

NounEdit

opia

  1. nominative plural of opium
  2. accusative plural of opium
  3. vocative plural of opium
Last modified on 1 February 2014, at 19:00