opprobrium

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested 1656, from Latin opprōbrium (reproach, disgrace), from opprōbrō (reproach, taunt), from ob (against) + probrum (disgrace, dishonor).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

opprobrium

  1. Disgrace arising from exceedingly shameful conduct; ignominy.
  2. Scornful reproach or contempt
    Don't give him a term of opprobrium.
  3. A cause of shame or disgrace.

QuotationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

opprōbrium n (genitive opprōbriī); second declension

  1. reproach, taunt
  2. scandal, disgrace, dishonour, shame

InflectionEdit

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative opprōbrium opprōbria
genitive opprōbriī opprōbriōrum
dative opprōbriō opprōbriīs
accusative opprōbrium opprōbria
ablative opprōbriō opprōbriīs
vocative opprōbrium opprōbria

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 22:43