optime

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin optimē ‘very well’, in the phrase optime disputasti ‘you have disputed very well’ (formerly used in reporting results at Cambridge).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

optime (plural optimes)

  1. (at Cambridge University) A student who graduates with second class ("senior optime") or third class ("junior optime") honours in Mathematics, or (loosely) in any other subject.

See alsoEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

optime

  1. (superlative form of bon) best

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From optimus (very good) +‎ .

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

optimē (not comparable)

  1. very well; excellently
Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of optimus (very good).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

optime

  1. vocative masculine singular of optimus

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

optime

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of optimar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of optimar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of optimar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of optimar.
Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 15:37