otiose

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ōtiōsus (idle), from ōtium (ease)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

otiose (comparative more otiose, superlative most otiose)

  1. Resulting in no effect.
  2. Reluctant to work or to exert oneself.
  3. Having no reason for being (raison d’être); having no point, reason, or purpose.
    • 1895, Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Letters, ch 3
      On Friday morning, I had to be at my house affairs before seven; and they kept me in Apia till past ten, disputing, and consulting about brick and stone and native and hydraulic lime, and cement and sand, and all sorts of otiose details about the chimney – just what I fled from in my father’s office twenty years ago;
    • 1969, G. R. Elton, The Practice of History:
      Neither the fact that the debates can become otiose, nor their zeal in so often simply echoing the points made in the past, need, however, lead one to suppose that the proper cure is silence.

SynonymsEdit

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Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ōtiōse

  1. vocative masculine singular of ōtiōsus
Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 15:59