overshape

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From over- +‎ shape.

VerbEdit

overshape (third-person singular simple present overshapes, present participle overshaping, simple past and past participle overshaped)

  1. (transitive) To transform; alter.
    • 2002, Orson Scott Card, Rebekah:
      "Why not?" she asked. Trying not to overshape the words. Trying not to say them too fast. Trying not to show how indignant she was at the idea of being left out.
  2. (transitive) To adjust; reshape.
    • 2009, Bob Smiley, Follow the Roar:
      This has become the routine this week: start off with a disaster, make some adjustment, and carry on. Yesterday in the media room he explained that because his swing was so off, he had intentionally been “overshaping” shots during the round.
  3. (transitive) To shape, form, or manipulate excessively.
    • 2008, Eddie Paul, Sheet Metal Fabrication: Techniques and Tips for Beginners and Pros:
      Keep checking your progress against the form Wheel lightly and check often so you don't overshape an area.

NounEdit

overshape (plural overshapes)

  1. That which is overshaped.
  2. That which forms or fits over something else.
    • 2009, Winifred Aldrich, Metric Pattern Cutting for Children's Wear and Babywear:
      If a wider fitting overshape is required extend the side seam approx. 1–2cm.
Last modified on 1 December 2013, at 19:04