Last modified on 23 May 2014, at 14:57

oxgang

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English oxegang, from Old English oxangang (an eighth of a plough-land, a hide), equivalent to ox +‎ gang.

NounEdit

oxgang (plural oxgangs)

  1. (archaic or Old English Law) The area of land that could be ploughed by an ox in a day; one eighth of a carucate.
  2. (archaic or Old English Law) A measure of land of uncertain quantity.
  3. (archaic, UK dialectal, Scotland) A measure of land equivalent to thirteen acres.

Usage notesEdit

  • Land was normally ploughed with a team of eight oxen. An oxgang is roughly 13-15 acres, an eighth share of the land ploughed by an ox team in a day. The area differed by locality. In Scottish law it was about 13 acres - but this was also dependent on soil quality.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Worchester, Joseph. A Dictionary of the English Language. Boston, 1881.