Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 23:50

palate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French palat, from Latin palātum (roof of the mouth, palate), perhaps of Etruscan origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

palate (plural palates)

  1. (anatomy) The roof of the mouth; the uraniscus.
  2. The sense of taste.
  3. (figuratively) relish; taste; liking (from the mistaken notion that the palate is the organ of taste)
    • Alexander Pope
      Hard task! to hit the palate of such guests.
  4. (figuratively) Mental relish; intellectual taste.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of T. Baker to this entry?)
  5. (botany) A projection in the throat of such flowers as the snapdragon.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

palate (third-person singular simple present palates, present participle palating, simple past and past participle palated)

  1. (nonstandard) To relish; to find palatable.
    • Wired [1]
      "If it’s way out there, it’s hard to palate," said Sreenivasan.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

palate f

  1. plural form of palata

VerbEdit

palate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of palare
  2. second-person plural imperative of palare
  3. Feminine plural of palato

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

pālāte

  1. first-person plural present active imperative of pālō

RomanianEdit

NounEdit

palate n pl

  1. plural form of palat