Last modified on 22 June 2014, at 09:01

palsy

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman paralisie, parleisie et al., from the accusative form of Latin paralysis, from Ancient Greek παράλυσις (parálusis, palsy), from παραλύειν (paralúein, to disable on one side), from παρά (pará, beside) + λύειν (lúein, loosen).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

palsy (plural palsies)

  1. (pathology) Complete or partial muscle paralysis of a body part, often accompanied by a loss of feeling and uncontrolled body movements such as shaking.
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VerbEdit

palsy (third-person singular simple present palsies, present participle palsying, simple past and past participle palsied)

  1. To paralyse, either completely or partially.
    • 1831, William Lloyd Garrison, The Liberator, To The Public [1]
      In the month of August, I issued proposals for publishing "THE LIBERATOR" in Washington city; but the enterprise, though hailed in different sections of the country, was palsied by public indifference.

Etymology 2Edit

From pals +‎ -y.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

palsy (comparative more palsy, superlative most palsy)

  1. (colloquial) Chummy, friendly.

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