Last modified on 22 October 2014, at 09:41

passive

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, Old French passif, from Latin passivus (serving to express the suffering of an action; in late Latin literally capable of suffering or feeling), from pati (to suffer), past participle of passus; compare patient.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

passive (comparative more passive, superlative most passive)

Examples (being in the passive voice)

The passive form of “A meteorite hit the earth” is “The earth was hit by a meteorite.”

  1. Being subjected to an action without producing a reaction.
  2. Taking no action.
    He remained passive during the protest.
  3. (grammar) Being in the passive voice.
  4. (psychology) Being inactive and submissive in a relationship, especially in a sexual one.
  5. (finance) Not participating in management.

AntonymsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

passive (plural passives)

  1. (uncountable, grammar) The passive voice of verbs.
  2. (countable, grammar) A form of a verb that is in the passive voice.

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

passive

  1. feminine form of passif

VerbEdit

passive

  1. first-person singular present indicative of passiver
  2. third-person singular present indicative of passiver
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of passiver
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of passiver
  5. second-person singular imperative of passiver

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

passive

  1. inflected form of passiv

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pas.ˈsi.ve/, [pas.siː.ve]
  • Hyphenation: pas‧sì‧ve

AdjectiveEdit

passive f pl

  1. feminine plural of passivo

AnagramsEdit