Last modified on 27 September 2014, at 09:22

paunch

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Early Modern French pance (modern spelling panse), from Latin pantex.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

paunch (plural paunches)

  1. The first stomach of a ruminant, the rumen.
  2. The abdomen or belly of a human or animal, especially a large, protruding one.
  3. (nautical) A paunch mat.
  4. The thickened rim of a bell, struck by the clapper.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

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VerbEdit

paunch (third-person singular simple present paunches, present participle paunching, simple past and past participle paunched)

  1. To remove the internal organs of a ruminant, such as a hare or rabbit prior to eating.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 3 scene 2
      (Caliban)
      Why, as I told thee, 'tis a custom with him
      I' th' afternoon to sleep: there thou may'st brain him,
      Having first seiz'd his books; or with a log
      Batter his skull, or paunch him with a stake,
      Or cut his wezand with thy knife

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