Last modified on 16 August 2014, at 03:36

pendent

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin pendens, pendentis, p.pr. of pendere to hang, to be suspended. Compare pendant. From Anglo-Norman pendaunt, Old French pendant.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pendent (comparative more pendent, superlative most pendent)

  1. Dangling, drooping, hanging down or suspended.
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, p. 71:
      The doctor's head [...] was framed in the golden semi-circle of a wig with long pendent curls that touched his shoulders []
    • 1986, Bryant W Rossiter, Roger C Baetzold, Investigations of Surfaces and Interfaces
      An interesting development has been the analysis of the image of a pendent drop by a video digitizer.
  2. pending in various senses.
  3. (grammar, of a sentence) incomplete in some sense, such as lacking a finite verb.
  4. (obsolete) Projecting over something; overhanging.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

pendent (plural pendents)

  1. Alternative spelling of pendant.

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

pendent

  1. third-person plural present indicative of pendre
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of pendre

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

pendent

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of pendō