Last modified on 6 December 2014, at 12:37

perk

See also: pērk

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From perquisite, by abbreviation.

Alternative formsEdit

  • perq (less common)

NounEdit

perk (plural perks)

  1. Perquisite.
    Free coffee is one of the perks of the job.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From percolate (verb) and percolator (noun), by abbreviation.

VerbEdit

perk (third-person singular simple present perks, present participle perking, simple past and past participle perked)

  1. Shortened form of percolate.

NounEdit

perk (plural perks)

  1. A percolator, particularly of coffee.

Etymology 3Edit

The origin is uncertain.

VerbEdit

perk (third-person singular simple present perks, present participle perking, simple past and past participle perked)

  1. To become more lively or enthusiastic.
  2. To exalt oneself; to bear oneself loftily.
    • Barrow
      to perk over them
  3. To make trim or smart; to straighten up; to erect; to make a jaunty or saucy display of.
    to perk the ears; to perk up one's head
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowper to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sherburne to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

perk (comparative more perk, superlative most perk)

  1. smart; trim; spruce; jaunty; vain
    • Spenser
      Perk as a peacock.

Etymology 4Edit

The origin is uncertain.

VerbEdit

perk (third-person singular simple present perks, present participle perking, simple past and past participle perked)

  1. (dated) To peer; to look inquisitively.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Charles Dickens to this entry?)

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *perrik, *parrik, from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz. Compare also park and German Pferch.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

perk n (plural perken, diminutive perkje n)

  1. a delimited piece of ground, e.g. a flowerbed