Last modified on 8 August 2014, at 14:24

picture

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EnglishEdit

A picture by Pere Borrell del Caso

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English pycture, from Old French picture, from Latin pictūra (the art of painting, a painting), from pingō (I paint).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

picture (plural pictures)

  1. A representation of anything (as a person, a landscape, a building) upon canvas, paper, or other surface, by drawing, painting, printing, photography, etc.
    • 2012 March 1, Brian Hayes, “Pixels or Perish”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 106: 
      Drawings and pictures are more than mere ornaments in scientific discourse. Blackboard sketches, geological maps, diagrams of molecular structure, astronomical photographs, MRI images, the many varieties of statistical charts and graphs: These pictorial devices are indispensable tools for presenting evidence, for explaining a theory, for telling a story.
  2. An image; a representation as in the imagination.
    • Coleridge
      My eyes make pictures when they are shut.
    • 2007, The Workers' Republic
      Prior to seeing him and meeting him, and hearing him speak, I had conjured up a picture of him in my mind, which actual contact with him proved to be an illusion. I had conceived of him [] as being tall, commanding, and as the advance notices of him, a sliver-tongued orator. I found him, however, to be the opposite of my mental picture; short, squat, unpretentious [...]
  3. A painting.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, The China Governess[1]:
      Here the stripped panelling was warmly gold and the pictures, mostly of the English school, were mellow and gentle in the afternoon light.
    There was a picture hanging above the fireplace.
  4. A photograph.
    I took a picture of the church.
  5. (informal) A motion picture.
    Casablanca is my all-time favorite picture.
  6. (dated, informal) ("the pictures") Cinema (as a form of entertainment)
    Let's go to the pictures.
  7. A paragon, a perfect example or specimen (of a category).
    She's the very picture of health.
  8. The art of painting; representation by painting.
    • Sir H. Wotton
      any well-expressed image [] either in picture or sculpture
  9. A figure; a model.
    • Howell
      the young king's picture [] in virgin wax

SynonymsEdit

  • (representation as in the imagination): image

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

picture (third-person singular simple present pictures, present participle picturing, simple past and past participle pictured)

  1. (transitive) To represent in or with a picture.
    • 1966, Margaret Naumburg, Dynamically oriented art therapy, page 154:
      What is striking about the self portrait is that the patient had pictured herself as a much younger woman
    • 1962, Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov, Pale Fire, page 130:
      while upon the shaded top of the box, drawn in perspective, the artist had pictured a plate with the beautifully executed, twin-lobed, brainlike, halved kernel of a walnut.
    • 1999, Lisa Gitelman, Scripts, grooves, and writing machines, page 107:
      Anyone "skilled in the art" could see from their language that Lemp and Wightman had not invented or patented the invention their draftsman had pictured.
  2. (transitive) To imagine or envision.
  3. (transitive) To depict.
    • 1985, Edmund Burke Feldman, Thinking about art‎, page 252:
      Drawing is picturing people, places, and things with line.
    • 1989, Jan Jelínek, The great art of the early Australians, page 490:
      Many rock paintings picture various species of fish.
    • 2004, Helen South, The everything drawing book, page 75:
      The sketch pictured here takes in the whole scene.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

StatisticsEdit

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


GuernésiaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French picture, from Latin pictūra (the art of painting, a painting), from pingō, pingere (paint; decorate, embellish), from Proto-Indo-European *peyḱ- (spot, color).

NounEdit

picture f (plural pictures)

  1. picture