placard

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English placquert, 'official document,' from Middle French placquier, 'to plate'. Cognate of 'plaque' (1560)

NounEdit

placard (plural placards)

  1. A sheet of paper or cardboard with a written or printed announcement on one side for display in a public place.
  2. (obsolete) A public proclamation; a manifesto or edict issued by authority.
    • Howell
      All placards or edicts are published in his name.
  3. (obsolete) Permission given by authority; a license.
    to give a placard to do something
  4. (historical) An extra plate on the lower part of the breastplate or backplate of armour.
  5. (historical) A kind of stomacher, often adorned with jewels, worn in the fifteenth century and later.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

placard (third-person singular simple present placards, present participle placarding, simple past and past participle placarded)

  1. To affix a placard to.
  2. To announce with placards.
    to placard a sale

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

placard m (plural placards)

  1. A cupboard, cabinet or closet built against or into a wall.
  2. An ad that is felt to be injurious, seditious or in otherwise bad taste.
  3. (dated) A placard.

Usage notesEdit

  • The use of placards for announcements by authorities having mostly disappeared, the word affiche frequently replaces it in that meaning.
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 04:01