plausible

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin plausibilis (deserving of applause), from the participle stem of plaudere (to applaud).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈplɔːz.ɪ.bəl/, /ˈplɔːz.ə.bəl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

plausible (comparative more plausible, superlative most plausible)

  1. Seemingly or apparently valid, likely, or acceptable; credible: a plausible excuse.
    • 1988, Andrew Radford, Transformative Grammar: A First Course, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-34750-5, page 64:
      In short, the twin assumptions that syntactic rules are category-based, and that there are a highly restricted finite set of categories in any natural language (perhaps no more than a dozen major categories), together with the assumption that the child either knows (innately) or learns (by experience) that all rules are structure-dependent ( =category-based), provide a highly plausible model of language acquisition, in which languages become learnable in a relatively short, finite period of time (a few years).
  2. Obtaining approbation; specifically pleasing; apparently right; specious.
    a plausible pretext; plausible manners; a plausible delusion
  3. Using specious arguments or discourse.
    a plausible speaker
  4. (obsolete) Worthy of being applauded; praiseworthy; commendable; ready.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Hacket to this entry?)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plausible m, f (masculine and feminine plural plausibles)

  1. plausible

FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plausible (masculine and feminine, plural plausibles)

  1. plausible

Middle FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plausible m, f (plural plausibles)

  1. plausible
Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 02:38