Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 00:14

plethoric

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin plethoricus, from Hellenistic Ancient Greek πληθωρικός (plēthōrikós), from πληθώρα (plēthṓra, plethora).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈplɛθəɹɪk/, /plɛˈθɒɹɪk/

AdjectiveEdit

plethoric (comparative more plethoric, superlative most plethoric)

  1. (medicine) Suffering from plethora; ruddy in complexion, congested or swollen with blood. [from 14th c.]
    • 1941, W Somerset Maugham, Up at the Villa, Vintage 2004, p. 81:
      Harold Atkinson, her host, was a fine handsome grey-haired man, plethoric and somewhat corpulent, with an eye for a pretty woman […].
  2. Excessive, overabundant, rife; loosely, abundant, varied. [from 17th c.]
    • 1982, TC Boyle, Water Music, Penguin 2006, p. 161:
      the judges [...] were arranging their robes and coughing into their fists, the ebb and flow of their plethoric wigs like a flock of sheep on the run.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit