See also: Plip

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Onomatopoeic.

NounEdit

plip (plural plips)

  1. A light sound or action like liquid hitting a surface.
    He heard the plips of rain on the roof.

VerbEdit

plip (third-person singular simple present plips, present participle plipping, simple past and past participle plipped)

  1. To make the sound of liquid hitting a hard surface.

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Plip (remote control locking device), perhaps influenced by onomatopoeia.

VerbEdit

plip (third-person singular simple present plips, present participle plipping, simple past and past participle plipped)

  1. To lock or unlock using a remote control locking device.
    • 2004, Jenny Colgan, Isla Dewar, Muriel Gray, et al. (contributors), Scottish Girls About Town, page 69,
      [] was unloading bags from the boot of a tiny, shiny, black Ka thing which she then plipped shut with an electronic key.
    • 2009, Matt Beaumont, Staying Alive, unnumbered page,
      I point it out to my companion, but he's already moving ahead of me, aiming the remote at the Porsche and plipping it open.
    • 2011, Stuart MacBride, Shatter the Bones, unnumbered page,
      He plipped the locks on the pool car, stuck the keys in his pocket and flexed his aching left hand.
Last modified on 20 October 2012, at 19:29