podium

See also: Podium

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin podium, from Ancient Greek πόδιον (podion, base), from diminutive of πούς (pous, foot).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

podium (plural podiums or podia)

  1. A platform on which to stand, as when conducting an orchestra or preaching at a pulpit.
  2. (proscribed) A stand used to hold notes when speaking publicly.
  3. (sports and other competitions) A steepled platform upon which the three competitors with the best results may stand when being handed their medals or prize.
  4. (sports) A result amongst the best three at a competition.
  5. A low wall, serving as a foundation, a substructure, or a terrace wall.
    1. The dwarf wall surrounding the arena of an amphitheatre, from the top of which the seats began.
    2. The masonry under the stylobate of a temple, sometimes a mere foundation, sometimes containing chambers.

SynonymsEdit

  • (stand used to hold notes when speaking publicly): lectern

Usage notesEdit

Some people object to the “stand for holding notes” sense on the grounds that because of its etymology, podium ought to refer to something that is stood upon (or that at least pertains to the feet in some way), and that lectern should instead be used, as it refers to “reading”.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

podium (third-person singular simple present podiums, present participle podiuming, simple past and past participle podiumed)

  1. (sports, proscribed) To finish in the top three at an event or competition.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek πόδιον (podion, base), from diminutive of πούς (pous, foot).

NounEdit

podium

  1. balcony, especially in an amphitheater

DescendantsEdit

  • Portuguese: pódio, poio
  • Provençal: pueg
  • Spanish: poyo
Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 02:52