Last modified on 17 June 2014, at 23:29

polysyllabicism

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

polysyllabicism (uncountable)

  1. (of linguistic expression) The state or characteristic of having a polysyllabic or overly complex style.
    • 1807, W. Taylor, Annual Review, p. 274:
      It will only facilitate the acquirement of a sesquipedalian diction, having the polysyllabicism without the precision of Johnson.
    • 1973, C. G. Dobbs, "Book Review of Soil Micro-Organisms by T. R. G. Gray and S. T. Williams (1971)," The Journal of Applied Ecology, vol. 10, no. 2, p. 665:
      If polysyllabicism is considered more 'scientific,' should we not seize the opportunity to call the study of micro-organisms 'mico-organicology'?
    • 2005 Feb. 15, Susan Elkin, In praise of polysyllabicism, Telegraph.co.uk, Telegraph Media Group:
      Vocabulary is the meat, blood and bones of language.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • polysyllabicism” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  • Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., 1989.