populace

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French populace, from Italian popolaccio.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

populace (countable and uncountable, plural populaces)

  1. The common people of a nation.
    • The populace despised their ignorant leader.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 2, Internal Combustion[1]:
      Throughout the 1500s, the populace roiled over a constellation of grievances of which the forest emerged as a key focal point. The popular late Middle Ages fictional character Robin Hood, dressed in green to symbolize the forest, dodged fines for forest offenses and stole from the rich to give to the poor. But his appeal was painfully real and embodied the struggle over wood.
  2. The inhabitants of a nation.

Usage notesEdit

  • Do not confuse populace (a noun) with populous (an adjective).

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

populace f

  1. population

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

populace f (plural populaces)

  1. populace, common people
Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 19:06