præmise

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

præmise (plural præmises)

  1. (archaic) Alternative spelling of premise.

VerbEdit

præmise (third-person singular simple present *præmises or *præmiseth, present participle præmising, simple past and past participle præmised)

  1. Obsolete spelling of premise.
    • 1564–1593, a scrap of a work reprinted in 1910 by Tucker Brooke in The Works of Christopher Marlowe, page 359:
      My dutie to your honor præmised, &c.
    • circa 1625, a scrap of a work reprinted in 1906 by Samuel Purchas in Hakluytus Posthumus, Or, Purchas His Pilgrimes: Contayning a History of the World in Sea Voyages and Lande Travells by Englishmen and Others (J. MacLehose and Sons), page 451:
      [] præmising somthing[sic] as a Preface of the great deliverances which God vouchsafed that Virgin Queen.
    • 1686, Rev. Charles Morton of Newington Green, Compendium Physicae, preface; reprinted in:
    • 1940, Publications of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, volume 33, page 5 (The Society)
      This I thought good to præmise that you should not be dishartned when you meat with diversities of oppinions in the folloing discourse: and because the former Phylosophers had their Method more Systematical, than the latter; I have therefore Chosen their method, and noted the Others Matter by the Way in those places where I observe a discrepance.
Last modified on 25 June 2013, at 20:17