Last modified on 6 June 2014, at 08:22

près

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French pres (closely), from Vulgar Latin *presso, from Latin pressus (concise), from premere. Cognate with Italian presso and Sicilian pressu.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

près

  1. near (a time or a place); close (to a time or a place)
    Mon anniversaire est très près. — It's my birthday soon.
    J'habite tout près. — I live just nearby.
SynonymsEdit

PrepositionEdit

près

  1. (formal or law) attached to, connects a person or an organisation delegated officially to a setting.
    un expert près les tribunaux — an expert witness
    les procureurs près les tribunaux — court-appointed prosecutors
    l'ambassade de France près le Saint-Siège — the French Embassy to the Holy See
    l'ambassadeur près le Saint-Siège — the ambassador to the Holy See
    près is only used with the embassies and ambassadors connected to the Vatican, as they are actually located outside, in Rome. All the other embassies and ambassadorial titles use common prepositions en, à, au or aux before host nations' names. (See Ambassades de France)
SynonymsEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • When used as a preposition (before a noun), près must be immediately followed by de (près de). The rare exceptions belong a very formal register listed above. For everyday speech and writing, près de is to be used to mean "near something".
  • The adverbial phrases de près (closely) and à peu près (approximately) can be used without de after them.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French pres (closely). See above.

AdverbEdit

près

  1. near

AntonymsEdit