Last modified on 17 July 2014, at 13:30

prest

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

prest

  1. (archaic) simple past tense and past participle of press

Etymology 2Edit

Old French prest

NounEdit

prest (plural prests)

  1. (rare) A payment of wages in advance
  2. A loan or advance (of money)
    • Francis Bacon
      Requiring of the city a prest of six thousand marks.
  3. A tax or duty
  4. (obsolete) A sum of money paid to a soldier or sailor upon enlistment
  5. (law) A duty in money formerly paid by the sheriff on his account in the exchequer, or for money left or remaining in his hands.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowell to this entry?)

VerbEdit

prest (third-person singular simple present prests, present participle presting, simple past and past participle prested)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To give as a loan; to lend.
    • E. Hall
      Sums of money [] prested out in loan.

AdjectiveEdit

prest (comparative more prest, superlative most prest)

  1. (obsolete) Ready; prompt; prepared.
    • R. of Gloucester
      All prest to such battle he was.
  2. (obsolete) Neat; tidy; proper.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tusser to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

prest m (plural prests)

  1. loan

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

NounEdit

prest m (definite singular presten, indefinite plural prester, definite plural prestene)

  1. a priest

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

NounEdit

prest m (definite singular presten, indefinite plural prestar, definite plural prestane)

  1. a priest

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

prest m (oblique plural prez or pretz, nominative singular prez or pretz, nominative plural prest)

  1. loan
  2. monetary gift

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

prest ?

  1. Obsolete spelling of präst.