probity

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French probité, from Latin probitas (uprightness, honesty), from probus (good, excellent, honest); see probe, prove.

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NounEdit

probity (plural probities)

  1. integrity
    • 1748, David Hume, Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of morals, London: Oxford University Press, 1973, § 1,
      … they can but bend our hearts to the love of probity and true honour, …
    • 1819, Washington Irving, The Sketch Book, English Writers on America:
      … when either the interest or reputation of their own country comes into collision with that of another, they … forget their usual probity and candour in the indulgence of splenetic remark, and an illiberal spirit of ridicule.

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Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 05:24