Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 02:34

psyche

See also: Psyche

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin psychē, from Ancient Greek ψυχή (psukhḗ, soul, breath)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

psyche (plural psyches)

  1. The human soul, mind, or spirit.
  2. (chiefly psychology) The human mind as the central force in thought, emotion, and behavior of an individual.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Shortened form of psychology, from French psychologie, from Latin psychologia, from Ancient Greek ψυχή (psukhḗ, soul) and -λογία (-logía, study of)

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AbbreviationEdit

psyche

  1. psychology

InterjectionEdit

psyche

  1. Used abruptly after a sentence to indicate that the speaker is only joking.

VerbEdit

psyche (third-person singular simple present psyches, present participle psyching, simple past and past participle psyched)

  1. (transitive) To put (someone) into a required psychological frame of mind.
  2. (transitive) To intimidate (someone) emotionally using psychology.
  3. (transitive, informal) To treat (someone) using psychoanalysis.

External linksEdit


DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: psy‧che

NounEdit

psyche f (plural psyches)

  1. psyche, soul, spirit

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Transliteration of Ancient Greek ψυχή (psukhḗ, soul, breath)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

psychē f (genitive psychēs); first declension

  1. mind
  2. spirit

InflectionEdit

First declension, Greek type.

Number Singular Plural
nominative psychē psychae
genitive psychēs psychārum
dative psychae psychīs
accusative psychēn psychās
ablative psychē psychīs
vocative psychē psychae