purview

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English purveu (proviso), from Anglo-Norman purveuest (it is provided), or purveu que (provided that) (statutory language), from Old French porveu (provided), past partiple of porveoir (to provide), from Latin provideo (See provide). Influenced by view and its etymological antecedants.

NounEdit

purview (plural purviews)

  1. (law) The enacting part of a statute.
  2. (law) The scope of a statute.
  3. Scope or range of interest or control.
    • 1788, James Madison, “The Right of the Convention to Frame such a Constitution”, in The Federalist: A Commentary on the Constitution of the United States, page 255:
      Will it be said that the fundamental principles of the Confederation were not within the purview of the convention, and ought not to have been varied?
    • 2003, Nicholas Asher and Alex Lascarides, Logics of Conversation, page 7:
      Rhetorical relations have truth conditional effects that contribute to meaning but lie outside the purview of compositional semantics.
  4. Range of understanding.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 05:20