pusillanimous

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Derived from Latin pusillus (very small) + animus (spirit).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pusillanimous (comparative more pusillanimous, superlative most pusillanimous)

  1. Showing ignoble cowardice, or contemptible timidity
    The soldier deserted his troop in a pusillanimous manner.
    • 1882Mark Twain, On the Decay of the Art of Lying [1].
      Therefore, the wise thing is for us diligently to train ourselves to lie thoughtfully, judiciously; to lie with a good object, and not an evil one; to lie for others' advantage, and not our own; to lie healingly, charitably, humanely, not cruelly, hurtfully, maliciously; to lie gracefully and graciously, not awkwardly and clumsily; to lie firmly, frankly, squarely, with head erect, not haltingly, tortuously, with pusillanimous mien, as being ashamed of our high calling.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 20:33