Last modified on 28 August 2014, at 11:49
See also: PUT, puț, and pût

EnglishEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English putten, puten, poten, from Old English *putian, *pūtian ("to push, put out"; attested by derivative putung (pushing, impulse, instigation, urging)) and potian (to push, thrust, strike, butt, goad), both from Proto-Germanic *putōną (to stick, stab), from Proto-Indo-European *bud- (to shoot, sprout). Compare also related Old English pȳtan (to push, poke, thrust, put out (the eyes)). Cognate with Dutch poten (to set, plant), Danish putte (to put), Swedish putta, pötta, potta (to strike, knock, push gently, shove, put away), Norwegian putte (to set, put), Norwegian pota (to poke), Icelandic pota (to poke), Dutch peuteren (to pick, poke around, dig, fiddle with), Sanskrit [script?] (bunda, arrow).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

put (third-person singular simple present puts, present participle putting, simple past and past participle put)

  1. To place something somewhere.
    She put her books on the table.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 8, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Philander went into the next room [] and came back with a salt mackerel that dripped brine like a rainstorm. Then he put the coffee pot on the stove and rummaged out a loaf of dry bread and some hardtack.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 20, The China Governess[1]:
      ‘No. I only opened the door a foot and put my head in. The street lamps shine into that room. I could see him. He was all right. Sleeping like a great grampus. Poor, poor chap.’
  2. To bring or set into a certain relation, state or condition.
    Put your house in order!
    He is putting all his energy into this one task.
    She tends to put herself in dangerous situations.
  3. (finance) To exercise a put option.
    He got out of his Procter and Gamble bet by putting his shares at 80.
  4. To express something in a certain manner.
    When you put it that way, I guess I can see your point.
    • Hare
      All this is ingeniously and ably put.
  5. (athletics) To throw a heavy iron ball, as a sport. (See shot put. Do not confuse with putt.)
  6. To steer; to direct one's course; to go.
  7. To play a card or a hand in the game called put.
  8. To attach or attribute; to assign.
    to put a wrong construction on an act or expression
  9. (obsolete) To lay down; to give up; to surrender.
    • Wyclif Bible, John xv. 13
      No man hath more love than this, that a man put his life for his friends.
  10. To set before one for judgment, acceptance, or rejection; to bring to the attention.
    to put a question; to put a case
    • Berkeley
      Put the perception and you put the mind.
    • Milton
      These verses, originally Greek, were put in Latin.
  11. (obsolete) To incite; to entice; to urge; to constrain; to oblige.
    • Jonathan Swift
      These wretches put us upon all mischief.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      Put me not to use the carnal weapon in my own defence.
    • Milton
      Thank him who puts me, loath, to this revenge.
  12. (mining) To convey coal in the mine, as for example from the working to the tramway.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See alsoEdit

putten

NounEdit

put (plural puts)

  1. (business) A right to sell something at a predetermined price.
  2. (finance) A contract to sell a security at a set price on or before a certain date.
    He bought a January '08 put for Procter and Gamble at 80 to hedge his bet.
    • Johnson's Cyc.
      A put and a call may be combined in one instrument, the holder of which may either buy or sell as he chooses at the fixed price.
  3. The act of putting; an action; a movement; a thrust; a push.
    the put of a ball
    • L'Estrange
      The stag's was a forc'd put, and a chance rather than a choice.
  4. An old card game.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Young to this entry?)
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Origin unknown. Perhaps related to Welsh pwt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

put (plural puts)

  1. (obsolete) An idiot; a foolish person.
    • Bramston
      Queer country puts extol Queen Bess's reign.
    • F. Harrison
      What droll puts the citizens seem in it all.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 244:
      The old put wanted to make a parson of me, but d—n me, thinks I to myself, I'll nick you there, old cull; the devil a smack of your nonsense shall you ever get into me.

Etymology 3Edit

Old French pute.

NounEdit

put (plural puts)

  1. (obsolete) A prostitute.

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

put

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of pudir
  2. second-person singular imperative form of pudir

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *putti, from Proto-Germanic *putjaz, from Latin puteus.

NounEdit

put m (plural putten, diminutive putje n)

  1. pit, well

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

put

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of putten
  2. imperative of putten

FinnishEdit

InterjectionEdit

put

  1. (onomatopoeia) putt, imitating the sound of a low speed internal combustion engine, usually repeated at least twice: put, put.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

put

  1. third-person singular past historic of pouvoir

LatvianEdit

VerbEdit

put

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of putēt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of putēt
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of putēt
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of putēt

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

put

  1. rafsi of sputu.

RomanianEdit

VerbEdit

put

  1. first-person singular present tense form of puți.
  2. first-person singular subjunctive form of puți.
  3. third-person plural present tense form of puți.

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

put (verbal noun putadh)

  1. push, shove, jostle

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

put m (genitive puta, plural putan)

  1. buoy

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *pǫtь, from Proto-Indo-European *ponth₂-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pȗt m (Cyrillic spelling пу̑т)

  1. road
    put za Sarajevo — road to Sarajevo
    gd(j)e vodi ovaj put? — where does this road lead?
  2. way
    ovim putem — this way
    ići pravim putem — to go the right way
    vodeni put — waterway
    ići svojim putem — to go one's own way
    stati nekome na put — to stand in somebody's way
    teret je na putu — cargo is on the way
    miči mi se s puta! — get out of my way!
    najkraći put do bolnice — the shortest way to the hospital
    na pola puta do škole — halfway to the school
  3. path
    krčiti put — to clear a path
    put do usp(j)eha — the path to success
  4. trip, journey
    ići na put — to go on a trip
    biti na putu — to be on a trip
    put oko sv(ij)eta — a trip around the world
    poslovni put — a business trip
  5. figurative and idiomatic senses
    sudskim putem — by legal means
    službenim/zvaničnim putem — through official channels
    Ml(ij)ečni put — Milky Way
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Slavic *plъtь.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pȕt f (Cyrillic spelling пу̏т)

  1. complexion, skin hue, tan
    sv(ij)etla put — fair complexion/tan
    tamna put — dark complexion/tan
    crna put — black complexion/tan
  2. body as a totality of physical properties and sensitivities
    mlada put — a young body
    gladna put — a hungry body
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From pȗt (road, path, way).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

pȗt (Cyrillic spelling пу̑т)

  1. (with genitive) to, towards
    put Sarajeva — towards Sarajevo
    put škole — to school
    vozimo se put sela — we are driving towards the village
    krenuo sam put grada — I went towards the city

Etymology 4Edit

From pȗt (road, path, way).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

pȗt (Cyrillic spelling пу̑т)

  1. time (with adjectives, ordinals and demonstratives indicating order in the sequence of actions or occurrences)
    prvi put — the first time, for the first time
    drugi put — the second time, for the second time; another time
    ovaj put — this time
    sljedeći/sledeći put — the next time
    posljednji/poslednji put — the last time
    po stoti put — for the hundredth time
    svaki put — every time

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English foot.

NounEdit

put

  1. foot