Last modified on 23 September 2014, at 20:26

putative

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested 1432, from Middle French putatif, from Latin putātīvus (supposed, purported), from putātus (thought), from putō.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

putative (comparative more putative, superlative most putative)

  1. Commonly believed or deemed to be the case; accepted by supposition rather than as a result of proof.
    • 1879, Maurice Mauris, "A Materialistic Artist," New York Times, 9 Nov., p. 10:
      [T]he lady . . . insisted upon going herself, requesting me to mind for a second the baby. . . . lo! the baby awoke and stared at me with a pair of big frightened eyes, which the little thing in another moment rolled in all directions, as if in search of its putative mother.
    • 1989, William E. Colby and Jeremy J. Stone, "US must support Thailand if Cambodia is to survive," Milwaukee Sentinel (Los Angeles Times Service), 28 Oct. (retrieved 15 Sep. 2009):
      Just as Prince Sihanouk is fronting for the Khmer Rouge today . . . so also was he their putative leader from 1970 to 1975.
    • 2006, Unmesh Kher, "No Neat Endings for the JonBenet Case," Time, 18 Aug.:
      Karr's past does raise suspicions. When he was arrested in Bangkok, he was living in a dormitory-like guesthouse in a neighborhood frequented by sex tourists. . . . Of course, Karr's putative pedophilia would not make him guilty of murder.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

putative

  1. feminine form of putatif

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

putative

  1. Feminine plural form of putativo