Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 03:07

pyxidium

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

pyxidium

pyxidium (plural pyxidia)

  1. (botany) A seed capsule in the form of a box, the seeds being released when the top splits off.
    • 1979, Organization for Flora Neotropica, New York Botanical Garden, Flora Neotropica: Issue 21, Part 1, p. 221:
      Key to Species of Cariniana Inflorescence predominantly terminal and subterminal; pyxidium without teeth at line of opercular dehiscence.
    • 1924, Samuel James Record, Clayton Dissinger Mell, Timbers of Tropical America, p. 467:
      The pyxidium has the trigonoidly cylindrical or obconical form of that of Couratari, but it is much thicker, heavier, and more solid in substance.
    • 1913, Georges Victor Legros, Fabre: Poet of Science, p. 176:
      The capsule of gold−beater's skin, in which the grubs of the Cione are enclosed, divides itself, at the moment of liberation, into two hemispheres "of a regularity so perfect that they recall exactly the bursting of the pyxidium when the seed is distributed".
    • 1836, Asa Gray, Elements of Botany, p. 221:
      A fruit of this kind is sometimes termed a pyxidium; that is, a little chest.

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