quitter

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman quiture, quyture et al., specialised use of quiture (burn mark, burning), from the participle stem of cuire (to cook).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

quitter (uncountable)

  1. (now rare, Jamaica) Matter flowing from a wound or sore; pus.
    • 1395, John Wycliffe, Bible, Job II:
      Therfor Sathan [...] smoot Joob with a ful wickid botche fro the sole of the foot til to his top; which Joob schauyde the quytere with a schelle, and sat in the dunghil.
  2. (farriery) A fistulous wound at the top of a horse's foot resulting from bruises, pricks, or neglected corns.
  3. (obsolete) Scoria of tin.

VerbEdit

quitter (third-person singular simple present quitters, present participle quittering, simple past and past participle quittered)

  1. to suppurate; ooze with pus.

Etymology 2Edit

From quit +‎ -er.

NounEdit

quitter (plural quitters)

  1. One who quits.
    Winners never quit and quitters never win.
  2. (obsolete) A deliverer.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From quitte or Late Latin quietare ("acquit, discharge, release"), from Latin quiētāre, present active infinitive of quiētō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

quitter

  1. to leave, to quit
  2. to part

ConjugationEdit


GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

quitter

  1. inflected form of quitt
Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 20:57