Last modified on 28 September 2014, at 20:49

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English rail, rayl, *reʒel, *reʒol (found in reʒolsticke (a ruler)), partly from Old English regol (a ruler, straight bar) and partly from Old French reille; both from Latin regula (rule, bar), from regere (to rule, to guide, to govern); see regular.

NounEdit

rail (plural rails)

  1. A horizontal bar extending between supports and used for support or as a barrier; a railing.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Old Applegate, in the stern, just set and looked at me, and Lord James, amidship, waved both arms and kept hollering for help. I took a couple of everlasting big strokes and managed to grab hold of the skiff's rail, close to the stern.
  2. The metal bar that makes the track for a railroad.
    • 2013 June 1, “Ideas coming down the track”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 13 (Technology Quarterly): 
      A “moving platform” scheme [] is more technologically ambitious than maglev trains even though it relies on conventional rails. Local trains would use side-by-side rails to roll alongside intercity trains and allow passengers to switch trains by stepping through docking bays.
  3. A railroad; a railway.
  4. A horizontal piece of wood that serves to separate sections of a door or window.
  5. (surfing) One of the lengthwise edges of a surfboard.
    • c. 2000, Nick Carroll, surfline.com [1]:
      Rails alone can only ever have a marginal effect on a board's general turning ability.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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VerbEdit

rail (third-person singular simple present rails, present participle railing, simple past and past participle railed)

  1. (intransitive) To travel by railway.
    • Rudyard Kipling
      Mottram of the Indian Survey had ridden thirty and railed one hundred miles from his lonely post in the desert []
  2. (transitive) To enclose with rails or a railing.
    • Ayliffe
      It ought to be fenced in and railed.
  3. (transitive) To range in a line.
    • Francis Bacon
      They were brought to London all railed in ropes, like a team of horses in a cart.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

French râle, Old French rasle. Compare Medieval Latin rallus. Named from its harsh cry, Vulgar Latin *rasculum, from Latin rādere (to scrape).

NounEdit

rail (plural rails)

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Wikispecies

  1. Any of several birds in the family Rallidae.

Usage notesEdit

Not all birds in the family Rallidae are rails by their common name. The family also includes coots, moorhens, crakes, flufftails, waterhens and others.

Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle French railler.

VerbEdit

rail (third-person singular simple present rails, present participle railing, simple past and past participle railed)

  1. To complain violently (against, about).
    • 2012 June 4, Lewis Smith, “Queen's English Society says enuf is enough, innit?”, the Guardian:
      The Queen may be celebrating her jubilee but the Queen's English Society, which has railed against the misuse and deterioration of the English language, is to fold.
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 27:
      Chief Joyi railed against the white man, whom he believed had deliberately sundered the Xhosa tribe, dividing brother from brother.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Old English hræġl.

NounEdit

rail (plural rails)

  1. (obsolete) An item of clothing; a cloak or other garment.
  2. (obsolete) Specifically, a woman's headscarf or neckerchief.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fairholt to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

Probably from Anglo-Norman raier, Middle French raier.

VerbEdit

rail (third-person singular simple present rails, present participle railing, simple past and past participle railed)

  1. (obsolete) To gush, flow (of liquid).
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book V:
      his breste and his brayle was bloodé – and hit rayled all over the see.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.2:
      So furiously each other did assayle, / As if their soules they would attonce haue rent / Out of their brests, that streames of bloud did rayle / Adowne, as if their springes of life were spent [...].

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English rail

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rail f (plural rails, diminutive railsje n or railtje n)

  1. rail

Usage notesEdit

The diminutive railsjes is only used if used for railway tracks.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://taaladvies.net/taal/advies/vraag/1519/railsje_railtje/