Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 23:14

rame

See also: räme

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Northern Middle English ramen (to cry out, scream), from Old English *hrāmian, from Proto-Germanic *hraimōną (to scream), *hraimaz (a scream), from Proto-Indo-European *kerei-, *skerei- (to scream, screech). Cognate with Old Norse hreimr (a scream, cry), and possibly to Old English hrēam (a cry, outcry, tumult, noise).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rame (third-person singular simple present rames, present participle raming, simple past and past participle ramed)

  1. (provincial, Northern England) To complain; moan; weep, cry.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rame

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of ramen

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From ramer.

NounEdit

rame f (plural rames)

  1. oar, paddle
    • 1837, Louis Viardot, L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manche, volume 1, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Chapter XXXIX:
      Le fils de Barberousse était si cruel et traitait si mal ses captifs, que ceux qui occupaient les bancs de sa chiourme ne virent pas plutôt la galère la Louve se diriger sur eux et prendre de l’avance, qu’ils lâchèrent tous à la fois les rames, et saisirent leur capitaine, qui leur criait du gaillard d’arrière de ramer plus vite ; puis se le passant de banc en banc, de la poupe à la proue, ils lui donnèrent tant de coups de dents, qu’avant d’avoir atteint le mât, il avait rendu son âme aux enfers....
      The son of Barbarossa was so cruel and treated his captives so badly, that those who occupied the benches of his galley no sooner saw the galley la Louve steering to them and advancing, that they let go of the oars all at once, and seized their captain, who yelled to them from the aftcastle to row faster; then passing him to each other from bench to bench, from the poop to the prow, they bit him so much, that before having reached the mast, he had rendered his soul to Hell....
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Catalan raima.

NounEdit

rame f (plural rames)

  1. ream (of paper)
  2. train; now especially refers to a subway train or an underground train
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


IndonesianEdit

NounEdit

rame

  1. hemp

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin aerāmen, from Latin aes (copper).

NounEdit

rame m

  1. copper (metal)

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

rāme

  1. vocative singular of rāmus

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *ormę, cognate with Proto-Germanic *armaz.

NounEdit

rame n (Cyrillic spelling раме)

  1. shoulder

DeclensionEdit