rancor

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Early 13th century, from Old French rancor, from Latin rancor (rancidity, grudge, rancor), from ranceō (be rotten or putrid, stink), from which also English rancid.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rancor (uncountable)

  1. The deepest malignity or spite; deep-seated enmity or malice; inveterate hatred.
    I could almost see the rancor in his eyes when he challenged me to a fight.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ rancor” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

AsturianEdit

NounEdit

rancor m (plural rancores)

  1. rancor (the deepest malignity or spite)

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ranceō (be rotten or putrid).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rancor m (genitive rancōris); third declension

  1. rancidity, stench, rankness
  2. grudge, rancor

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative rancor rancōrēs
genitive rancōris rancōrum
dative rancōrī rancōribus
accusative rancōrem rancōrēs
ablative rancōre rancōribus
vocative rancor rancōrēs

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

rancor f (oblique plural rancors, nominative singular rancor, nominative plural rancors)

  1. ill-will; negative opinion or intention

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin rancor (rancor; putridity).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rancor m (plural rancores)

  1. grudge (deep seated animosity)
  2. (uncountable) rancor

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 11:54