reasonability

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

reasonability (usually uncountable, plural reasonabilities)

  1. The state or quality of being reasonable; reasonableness.
    • 1897, Judson Harmon, "Brief for the United States in the Case of the United States of America v. The Trans-Missouri Freight Association," The Yale Law Journal, vol. 6, no. 6, p. 323n.,
      The very difficult inquiry as to the reasonability of such agreements was an inadequate protection.
    • 1982, Roderick Chisholm, The Foundations of Knowing, Univ. of Minnesota Press, p. 7,
      Epistemic reasonability could be understood in terms of the general requirement to try to have the largest possible set of logically independent beliefs that is such that the true beliefs outnumber the false beliefs.
    • 2003, F. R. Anscombe, "Quiet Contributor: The Civic Career and Times of John W. Tukey," Statistical Science, vol. 18, no. 3, p. 302 (quoting National Academy of Sciences president Philip Handler),
      "The nation and the Academy can count themselves fortunate that your integrated intelligence, insight, sound judgment, good taste, and unflappable reasonability were all available."
Last modified on 26 November 2009, at 19:38