See also: Rede

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Old English rǣd. Middle English rǣd, rað. Cognate with Danish råd, Dutch raad, German Rat, Swedish råd. Indo-European cognates include Latin ratiō (reason, judgment, counsel).

NounEdit

rede (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Help, advice, counsel.
    • 1603, William Shakespeare, "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark", Act 1, Scene 3:
      Ophelia:
      Do not, as some ungracious pastors do,
      Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven,
      Whiles, like a puffed and reckless libertine,
      Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads,
      And recks not his own rede.
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, vol. 1:
      When the Bull heard these words he knew the Ass to be his friend and thanked him, saying, "Right is thy rede"
    • 1954, JRR Tolkien, The Two Towers:
      ‘Yet do not cast all hope away. Tomorrow is unknown. Rede oft is found at the rising of the Sun.’
  2. (archaic) Decision, a plan.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English reden, ræden, from Old English rǣdan (to counsel, advise; plot, design; rule, gover, guide; determine, decide, decree; read, explain). More at read.

VerbEdit

rede (third-person singular simple present redes, present participle reding, simple past and past participle red or redd)

  1. (transitive, archaic or UK dialectal) To govern, protect.
  2. (transitive, archaic or UK dialectal) To discuss, deliberate.
  3. (transitive, archaic or UK dialectal) To advise.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book IV:
      lo syr said his squyer, here I fynde wrytyng of yow, therfor I rede yow retorne ageyne to the Courte [...].
  4. (transitive, archaic or UK dialectal) To interpret (a riddle or dream); explain
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
    The secret of Man's Being is still like the Sphinx's secret: a riddle that he cannot rede; - Resartus.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rede

  1. ready
  2. prepared

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hreiðr.

NounEdit

rede c (singular definite reden, plural indefinite reder)

  1. nest (bird-built structure)
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse reiða.

VerbEdit

rede (imperative red, infinitive at rede, present tense reder, past tense redte, past participle har redt)

  1. comb (to groom the hair with a toothed implement)
  2. make (a bed)

NounEdit

rede

  1. insight, clarification, especially in the expression gøre sig (selv) rede for

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rede c (plural redes or reden, diminutive redetje n)

  1. reason
  2. address, discourse
  3. place to anchor, anchorage

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

rede

  1. singular past subjunctive of rijden
  2. singular present subjunctive of reden

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

rede

  1. First-person singular present of reden.
  2. Imperative singular of reden.
  3. First-person singular subjunctive I of reden.
  4. Third-person singular subjunctive I of reden.

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ræd.

AdjectiveEdit

rede

  1. redness
  2. Alternative spelling of rǣde.
  3. dative of ræd/rǣd/rað

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

rede

  1. to read

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese rede, from Latin rete.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rede f (plural redes)

  1. net
  2. hammock
  3. network

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

rede ?

  1. A bird's nest.

DeclensionEdit

Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 07:29