redress

EnglishEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman redrecier and Middle French redresser, from re- + drecier (dress).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

redress (third-person singular simple present redresses, present participle redressing, simple past and past participle redressed)

  1. To put in order again; to set right; to emend; to revise.
    • Milton
      In yonder spring of roses intermixed / With myrtle, find what to redress till noon.
    • A. Hamilton
      your wish that I should redress a certain paper which you had prepared
  2. To set right, as a wrong; to repair, as an injury; to make amends for; to remedy; to relieve from.
    • Shakespeare
      Those wrongs, those bitter injuries, [] / I doubt not but with honour to redress.
  3. To make amends or compensation to; to relieve of anything unjust or oppressive; to bestow relief upon.
    • Dryden
      'Tis thine, O king! the afflicted to redress.
    • Byron
      Will Gaul or Muscovite redress ye?
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To put upright again; to restore.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book X:
      ‘Well,’ sayde Sir Palomydes, ‘than shall ye se how we shall redresse oure myghtes!’
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

redress (plural redresses)

  1. The act of redressing; a making right; reformation; correction; amendment.
  2. A setting right, as of wrong, injury, or oppression; as, the redress of grievances; hence, relief; remedy; reparation; indemnification.
  3. One who, or that which, gives relief; a redresser.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

re- +‎ dress.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

redress (third-person singular simple present redresses, present participle redressing, simple past and past participle redressed)

  1. To dress again.
    • 1963, Albert J. Solnit, ‎Milton J. E. Senn, ‎Sally Provence, Modern perspectives in child development (page 588)
      The teacher first undressed and redressed the doll for the child, then showed her how to pull the snaps apart. No other activity interested the little girl, and after repeated demonstrations she was still trying unsuccessfully to undress the doll.
  2. To redecorate a previously existing film set so that it can double for another set.

NounEdit

redress (plural redresses)

  1. The redecoration of a previously existing film set so that it can double for another set.
    This is a redress of the office set.

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 17:00