remember

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English remembren, from Old French remembrer (to remember), from Late Latin rememorari (to remember again), from re- + memor (mindful), from Proto-Indo-European *mer-, *smer- (to think about, be mindful, remember). Cognate with Old English mimorian, mymerian (to remember, commemorate), Old English māmorian (to deliberate, plan out, design). More at mammer.

VerbEdit

remember (third-person singular simple present remembers, present participle remembering, simple past and past participle remembered)

  1. To recall from one's memory; to have an image in one's memory.
    • 1852, Mrs M.A. Thompson, “The Tutor's Daughter”, in Graham's American Monthly Magazine of Literature, Art, and Fashion[1], page 266:
      In the lightness of my heart I sang catches of songs as my horse gayly bore me along the well-remembered road.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 6, The China Governess[2]:
      ‘[…] I remember a lady coming to inspect St. Mary's Home where I was brought up and seeing us all in our lovely Elizabethan uniforms we were so proud of, and bursting into tears all over us because “it was wicked to dress us like charity children”. […]’.
  2. To memorize; to put something into memory.
    Please remember this formula!
  3. To not forget (to do something required)
    Remember to lock the door when you go out.
  4. To convey greetings from.
    Please remember me to your brother.
  5. (obsolete) To put in mind; to remind (also used reflexively)
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 1 scene 2
      Since thou dost give me pains, / Let me remember thee what thou hast promis'd, / Which is not yet perform'd me.
    • Chapman
      My friends remembered me of home.
    • Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Secret Parting, lines 5-7
      But soon, remembering her how brief the whole
      Of joy, which its own hours annihilate,
      Her set gaze gathered
  6. (intransitive) To engage in the process of recalling memories.
    You don't have to remind him; he remembers very well.

Usage notesEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 17:22