Last modified on 26 September 2014, at 06:53

repeat

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French repeter, from Latin repetō, from Latin prefix re- (again) + peto (attack, beseech).

VerbEdit

repeat (third-person singular simple present repeats, present participle repeating, simple past and past participle repeated)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To do or say again (and again).
    The scientists repeated the experiment in order to confirm the result.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, The Celebrity:
      When this conversation was repeated in detail within the hearing of the young woman in question, and undoubtedly for his benefit, Mr. Trevor threw shame to the winds and scandalized the Misses Brewster then and there by proclaiming his father to have been a country storekeeper.
  2. (obsolete) To make trial of again; to undergo or encounter again.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Waller to this entry?)
  3. (law, Scotland) To repay or refund (an excess received).

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

repeat (plural repeats)

  1. An iteration; a repetition.
    We gave up after the third repeat because it got boring.
  2. A television program shown after its initial presentation -- particularly many weeks after its initial presentation; a rerun.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit