Last modified on 8 December 2014, at 02:21

repose

See also: reposé

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin repausare (to lay at rest, quiet, also nourish, intransitive to be at rest, rest, repose), from Latin re- (again) + pausare (to pause, rest), from pausa (pause), from Ancient Greek παῦσις (paûsis).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

repose (countable and uncountable, plural reposes)

  1. (dated) rest, sleep
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows
      Dark and deserted as it was, the night was full of small noises, song and chatter and rustling, telling of the busy little population who were up and about, plying their trades and vocations through the night till sunshine should fall on them at last and send them off to their well-earned repose.
    • 1945, George Orwell, Animal Farm, chapter 6
      You would not rob us of our repose, would you, comrades? You would not have us too tired to carry out our duties?
  2. quietness, ease; peace, calmness
    • Dante Divine Comedy,Inferno, Canto 10
      So may thy lineage find at last repose I thus adjured him
  3. (geology) period between eruptions of a volcano.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

repose (third-person singular simple present reposes, present participle reposing, simple past and past participle reposed)

  1. To lie at rest; to rest.
    • Chapman
      Within a thicket I reposed.
  2. To lie; to be supported.
    trap reposing on sand
  3. To lay, to set down.
    • Chapman
      But these thy fortunes let us straight repose / In this divine cave's bosom.
    • Woodward
      Pebbles reposed in those cliffs amongst the earth [] are left behind.
  4. To place, have, or rest; to set; to entrust.
    • Shakespeare
      The king reposeth all his confidence in thee.
  5. To reside in something.
  6. (figuratively) To remain or abide restfully without anxiety or alarms.
    • I. Taylor
      It is upon these that the soul may repose.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External linksEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

repose

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of reposar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of reposar

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

repose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of reposer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of reposer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of reposer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of reposer
  5. second-person singular imperative of reposer

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

repose

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of reposar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of reposar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of reposar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of reposar.