reptile

See also: réptile

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Middle English reptil, from Old French reptile, from Late Latin rēptile, neuter of reptilis (creeping), from Latin rēpō (to creep), from Proto-Indo-European *rep- (to creep, slink) (Pokorny; Watkins, 1969).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

reptile (plural reptiles)

  1. A cold-blooded vertebrate of the class Reptilia.
  2. (figuratively) A mean or grovelling person.
    • Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
      "That reptile," whispered Pott, catching Mr. Pickwick by the arm, and pointing towards the stranger. "That reptile — Slurk, of the Independent!"

HyponymsEdit

Related termsEdit


TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

reptile (not comparable)

  1. Creeping; moving on the belly, or by means of small and short legs.
  2. Grovelling; low; vulgar.
    a reptile race or crew; reptile vices
    • Burke
      There is also a false, reptile prudence, the result not of caution, but of fear.
    • Coleridge
      And dislodge their reptile souls / From the bodies and forms of men.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rēptile

  1. neuter nominative singular of rēptilis
  2. neuter accusative singular of rēptilis
  3. neuter vocative singular of rēptilis
Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 00:06